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Emmanuel Carrasquillo

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Sere tu proximo fisico /Scorpio/ 19


35,950 notes | Reblog | 3 weeks ago
currentsinbiology:

Targeting cancer’s sweet tooth
Ludwig researchers have elucidated a key mechanism by which cancer cells change how they metabolize glucose to generate the energy and raw materials required to sustain runaway growth.
Published online in Cell Metabolism, the Ludwig Cancer Research study also reveals how the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma harnesses the mechanism to resist targeted therapies that should disrupt this capability—known as the Warburg effect—and suggests how such resistance might be overcome. In detailing the molecular circuitry of the phenomenon, the researchers uncover several possible targets for new drugs that might disrupt cancer cell metabolism to destroy tumors.
"Cancer and other fast-growing cells extract energy from glucose using a process that ordinarily kicks in only when oxygen is in short supply," explains Ludwig scientist Paul Mischel, MD, who is based at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. "This allows them to thread the needle: they get the energy they need from glucose but also retain the carbon-based building blocks for molecules like lipids, proteins and DNA, which dividing cells need in large quantities."
More at EurekAlert
FIGURE 1 | Glucose metabolism in mammalian cells. From the following article: Why do cancers have high aerobic glycolysis? Robert A. Gatenby & Robert J. Gillies. Nature Reviews Cancer 4, 891-899 (November 2004)  doi:10.1038/nrc1478

currentsinbiology:

Targeting cancer’s sweet tooth

Ludwig researchers have elucidated a key mechanism by which cancer cells change how they metabolize glucose to generate the energy and raw materials required to sustain runaway growth.

Published online in Cell Metabolism, the Ludwig Cancer Research study also reveals how the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma harnesses the mechanism to resist targeted therapies that should disrupt this capability—known as the Warburg effect—and suggests how such resistance might be overcome. In detailing the molecular circuitry of the phenomenon, the researchers uncover several possible targets for new drugs that might disrupt cancer cell metabolism to destroy tumors.

"Cancer and other fast-growing cells extract energy from glucose using a process that ordinarily kicks in only when oxygen is in short supply," explains Ludwig scientist Paul Mischel, MD, who is based at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. "This allows them to thread the needle: they get the energy they need from glucose but also retain the carbon-based building blocks for molecules like lipids, proteins and DNA, which dividing cells need in large quantities."

More at EurekAlert

FIGURE 1 | Glucose metabolism in mammalian cells. From the following article: Why do cancers have high aerobic glycolysis? Robert A. Gatenby & Robert J. Gillies. Nature Reviews Cancer 4, 891-899 (November 2004)  doi:10.1038/nrc1478



137 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago
thenewenlightenmentage:

Hubble Telescope’s ‘Pillars of Creation’ Remade in Computer Simulation
An astronomer has recreated the famous “Pillars of Creation” using a computer.
In 1995, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope trained its gaze on a stellar nursery inside the Eagle Nebula, a billowing could of gas and dust about 7,000 light-years from Earth. The resulting image, dubbed “The Pillars of Creation,” ranks among “Earthrise” and the “Pale Blue Dot" as one of the most iconic space photos of all time.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Hubble Telescope’s ‘Pillars of Creation’ Remade in Computer Simulation

An astronomer has recreated the famous “Pillars of Creation” using a computer.

In 1995, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope trained its gaze on a stellar nursery inside the Eagle Nebula, a billowing could of gas and dust about 7,000 light-years from Earth. The resulting image, dubbed “The Pillars of Creation,” ranks among “Earthrise” and the “Pale Blue Dot" as one of the most iconic space photos of all time.

Continue Reading



96 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago
gravitationalbeauty:

Galaxies Collide in NGC 3256 

gravitationalbeauty:

Galaxies Collide in NGC 3256 



1,200 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago

swolizard:

tsuntsunmisaki:

how can you not reblog this

I have finally found the source of my sarcasm. Thanks, Pixar

(Source: runescrap)


619,328 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago
Beach, The best place to be.
#Beach #nature #bestplacetobe #surfday #PuertoRico #guy

Beach, The best place to be.
#Beach #nature #bestplacetobe #surfday #PuertoRico #guy



(Source: voguelustys)



137,697 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago

274 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago
hellokittyphatcat:

#420 #weed #holiday #happy #420 #earthday #green #😗💨🍃🌿🌴

hellokittyphatcat:

#420 #weed #holiday #happy #420 #earthday #green #😗💨🍃🌿🌴



11 notes | Reblog | 1 year ago

(Source: besitodecoco)



78 notes | Reblog | 1 year ago
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